European Free Trade Association (EFTA) Sitzung des Ministerrats, November 1964

(...) The Chairman [Douglas Jay], speaking as the United Kingdom Delegate, opened the discussion. He emphasized the great importance attached by the new Government of his country to EFTA, both in the present and in the future. It was, therefore, somewhat ironical that within so short a time after taking office that the Government had had to institute measures which must have surprised and disappointed many of its EFTA partners. (...) In his Government’s opinion it was no less in the interests of the other EFTA countries and many other sterling countries that the currency [pound sterling] should be strengthened and its strength demonstrated. Action had had to be taken to that end. (...) It could be argued that it would have been better in the circumstances for the United Kingdom to impose quotas rather than a surcharge.[...]

European Free Trade Association, Sitzung des Ministerrats, November 1964[1]

(...) The Chairman [Douglas Jay], speaking as the United Kingdom Delegate, opened the discussion. He emphasized the great importance attached by the new Government of his country to EFTA, both in the present and in the future. It was, therefore, somewhat ironical that within so short a time after taking office that the Government had had to institute measures which must have surprised and disappointed many of its EFTA partners. (...) In his Government’s opinion it was no less in the interests of the other EFTA countries and many other sterling countries that the currency [pound sterling] should be strengthened and its strength demonstrated. Action had had to be taken to that end. (...) It could be argued that it would have been better in the circumstances for the United Kingdom to impose quotas rather than a surcharge. The reason why that had not been done was that the necessary machinery had been dismantled and it would not have been practicable to institute quotas before the growth of imports became too great. (...) In either case the effect on imports in total would have been the same. (...) The same would have been true had internal deflationary measures been taken. (...) Moreover, in the short term it would have been as damaging to the other EFTA countries as either quotas or import charges. (...) Since his Government regarded the strengthening and cohesion of EFTA as a major aim of British political and economic policy, it had been extremely anxious to frame and conduct the measures taken as to minimize the temporary disadvantage caused to Britain’s EFTA partners. As Ministers were aware, his Government had considered very carefully the possibility of unilateral acceleration of the protective industrial tariffs that it still maintained within EFTA. (...) The responsibility for having to sacrifice that solution did not lie with the United Kingdom. (...)

The United Kingdom Delegate [Patrick Gordon-Walker] said that from the point of view of foreign policy his Government regarded the continuing success, expansion and prosperity of EFTA as one of its major national interests. Commenting that it was the first time a British Foreign Secretary had attended a meeting of the Council, he suggested that it might be useful if the Foreign Ministers of the EFTA countries met from time to time to discuss the whole range of common problems and policies. EFTA, which he regarded as having great permanent value, had been steadily acquiring a role of increasing stature in the world and greater account was being taken of it on both sides of the Atlantic. One sign of that was the fact that it was now the subject of attack from people outside who did not wish it well. (...) A strong EFTA and a weak Britain or any other Member state was impossible. He assured Ministers that the United Kingdom Government would do all it could, in the immediate difficulties and thereafter, to help EFTA: it felt itself wholly and completely a part of the Association. (...) The question was not whether the charge could be abolished immediately or in the very near future but what else would have to be done in that case. (...) He thought all alternatives would have the same, if not worse, effects for EFTA. (...) Turning to the time factor, he said it was the firm intention of the Government that the charge should be only temporary. However, an exact date for its removal could not be given. (...) In conclusion he said that the United Kingdom was very ready to agree to proposals for an economic policy committee within EFTA to consider the economic situation and problems of Member countries and other matters of common interests. (...)

The Swiss Delegate [Hans Schaffner] thanked the United Kingdom Delegates for the positive aspects of their statements (...) .He would only point out that the development of trade with Switzerland had been very encouraging for the British economy ever since the foundation of EFTA. From 1960 to 1963 British exports to Switzerland had increased by 62 per cent and British imports from Switzerland by 36 per cent. At the same time the trade balance in favour of Great Britain had shown an increase of 77 per cent. (...) If the total of British exports was unsatisfactory, that was definitely not due to the trade with Switzerland. However, as to the methods applied by Great Britain to improve its balance of payments, in his opinion they ran counter to a policy of integration, were incompatible with the rules of the Stockholm Convention, and had shaken confidence in the future of EFTA. (...) The measures were contrary to integration for they cancelled unilaterally the advantages conceded on tariff cuts (...). The measures were in effect protectionist and represented, from the EFTA point of view, a reversal of the integration so far achieved. (...) In his opinion there was little doubt that the 15 per cent charge, if not abolished within a few months, would not only perpetuate a unilateral disintegration but also start a vicious circle fraught with the risk of leading to the devaluation of sterling. (...) The 15 per cent charge was not compatible with the Stockholm Convention. (...) The Association was now faced with a breach of the Convention and that was most damaging in a closely knit association with precisely defined objectives. If the rule of law were not quickly restored the disruption would go further, causing more uncertainty and distrust. (...) In the circumstances the Swiss Government urgently requested the Government of the United Kingdom to give the following assurances: (a) to reduce the charge from 15 to, say, 10 per cent in a matter of weeks; (...) (b) to eliminate the charge altogether in a matter of a few months; (...)

The Swiss Delegate [Friedrich Traugott Wahlen] drew attention to the effects of the British measures. In EFTA itself there was no doubt that a great deal of damage had been done to the confidence linking the eight countries. A step had been taken which, in the eyes of the small EFTA countries that also had very difficult economic problems to solve, might seem like an invitation to take unilateral measures that were indefensible under the Convention. That, of course, would be the beginning of the end. As to integration as a whole, in the last few years EFTA had grown in appreciation whereas the European Economic Community had experienced great difficulties. The disintegrating factor introduced into EFTA by the British action went beyond the boundaries of EFTA and affected the Members of the EEC, strengthening their approach while weakening that of the EFTA countries. (...)

The Swedish Delegate [Gunnar Lange] said his Government had taken note with great apprehension and anxiety of the message from the British Foreign Secretary (...) regarding the introduction (...) of a 15 per cent charge on imports from all sources, thus including also imports from the EFTA countries (...) If imports into the United Kingdom from EFTA countries had increased by 26 per cent in the first nine months of 1964, at the same time imports from the EEC had increased by 25 per cent and imports from the United States by even more. EFTA was, therefore, not in a special position in that respect. On the other hand, the reduction in trade resulting from the British measures would hit the small EFTA countries harder than the EEC and the United States because the United Kingdom was a much bigger market for them. That was one of the reasons for the very critical attitude taken within EFTA. The import charge was obviously incompatible with the Convention. The measure itself and the way it had been handled contributed to the crisis of confidence in which EFTA now found itself. (...) Unintentionally it had dealt a severe blow to the Association which he could only hope would not be fatal. (...) In the Swedish view the first step to be taken must be to create efficient machinery to handle not only the present critical situation of the United Kingdom but also to prevent similar situations from arising in the future. Had such machinery been operating the British difficulties could probably have been tackled already in the summer and solutions arrived at that would have been much less detrimental than those now adopted. (...)

The Danish Delegate [Per Haekkerup] said his country was the least affected by the import charge (...), as only 13 per cent of Danish exports to that country would come under the rule. He, therefore, wished to speak (...) rather of the question of general principle involved in the British action. (...) He associated himself with those speakers who had said that the most important consideration was that the step taken by the United Kingdom Government was against the letter and the spirit of the EFTA Convention. (...) What would be the consequences of it? Other EFTA countries were experiencing balance of payments difficulties. In the case of Denmark the deficit in the balance of payments for the first six months of 1964 had been half that of the United Kingdom, but on a per capita basis it was seven times as great. (...) When the United Kingdom introduced methods that merely resulted in part of its balance of payments difficulties being transferred to Denmark, all the arguments were on the side of the element in the country that desired affiliation with the EEC. It gave them a basis for saying that EFTA was not really the solution for Denmark. Thus the previous week the two big opposition parties in the Danish Parliament [the Conservatives and the liberal Venstre], which held 40 per cent of the votes, had come forward for the first time with resolutions demanding a reversal of Denmark’s marketing policy. The Government had succeeded in avoiding a vote on that and in getting a compromise solution voted. (...)

Ministers then held an informal discussion of this item of their agenda, of which the following is an agreed minute: (1) Ministers have considered the report of the working party which had been studying the recent British economic measures and their implications for EFTA. (2) The other Ministers pointed out to the British Ministers that the application of the 15 per cent charge on imports into the United Kingdom was inconsistent with the United Kingdom’s obligations under the Convention and the Association Agreement [with Finland]. It was generally urged on British Ministers that a firm date in a few months’ time should be fixed for removing or reducing the charge. (...) (3) British Ministers, while not claiming that the charge came within the terms of the Convention and the Association Agreement, pointed out that Article 19 provided for the use of quantitative restrictions on imports to correct a serious balance of payments deficit. Although such measures would have brought the United Kingdom within the terms of the Stockholm Convention, they would, in the British view, have been more damaging to EFTA and to the development of EFTA trade in the United Kingdom market. British Ministers affirmed that the charge was a temporary measure and that the British Government was firmly resolved in the interests of the United Kingdom, as well as that of their EFTA partners, to reduce it and to abolish it at the earliest possible moment. (...) (6) The Council of Ministers agreed to keep the situation under close and continuous review. (...) (8) Furthermore, in order to provide better means for giving effect in future to the consultations provided for in Article 30 of the Convention, Ministers decided to set up an Economic Committee of senior officials from capitals to meet as frequently as necessary. (...)


[1] Joint Council FINLAND-EFTA, 25. Sitzung, 19.-20.11.1964, EFTA-Archiv Genf, FINEFTA/JC.SR 25/64, 22.1.1965, Transkription durch Wolfram Kaiser (10.01.2008). Eine Druckversion der Quelle befindet sich in: Hartmut Kaelble, Rüdiger Hohls (Hgg.): Geschichte der europäischen Integration bis 1989, Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag 2016, S. 147—150, Band 1 der Schriftreihe Europäische Geschichte in Quellen und Essays.


Das Europa der „äußeren Sieben“. Die „surcharge“-Krise der Europäischen Freihandelsgemeinschaft im Herbst 1964[1]

[Weitere Artikel Version 2008]

Von Wolfram Kaiser

Als Resultat ihrer Erweiterung auf inzwischen 28 Mitgliedstaaten zum 1. Juli 2013 ist die heutige Europäische Union (EU) nahezu identisch mit einem geografisch definierten Europa. Das war in der frühen Nachkriegszeit keineswegs so. Vielmehr wurde das „Kerneuropa“ der Europäischen Gemeinschaft für Kohle und Stahl (EGKS, 1951/52) und der Europäischen Wirtschaftsgemeinschaft (EWG, 1957/58) von nur sechs westeuropäischen Staaten gegründet, nämlich Frankreich, Italien, der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, den Niederlanden, Belgien und Luxemburg. Andere demokratisch verfasste Staaten Westeuropas schlossen sich zunächst nicht an. Großbritanniens noch immer enge Wirtschaftsbeziehungen mit dem Commonwealth schienen die Teilnahme an einer europäischen Zollunion auszuschließen, die Schweiz, Schweden und (wenngleich weniger rigide) Österreich lehnten diese Option zunächst als nicht kompatibel mit ihrer Neutralität ab, und die sozialdemokratisch regierten Länder Dänemark und Norwegen entschieden sich gegen die Teilnahme, weil sie für zwischenstaatliche institutionelle Lösungen waren und das neue „Kerneuropa“ vielfach als katholisch und konservativ dominiert wahrnahmen.[2]

Noch während der Verhandlungen, die zur EWG-Gründung führen sollten, schlug die konservative britische Regierung zunächst im Rahmen der Organisation für Europäische Wirtschaftliche Zusammenarbeit (OEEC) vor, eine größere und institutionell strikt zwischenstaatliche Freihandelszone zu gründen.[3] Damit wollte sie vor allem die wirtschaftlichen Gefahren ihres Selbstausschlusses von der EWG abwenden. Die anschließenden Regierungsverhandlungen scheiterten jedoch endgültig Ende 1958 am ersten europäischen Veto des neuen französischen Präsidenten Charles de Gaulle. Daraufhin gründeten Großbritannien, Schweden, Norwegen, Dänemark, die Schweiz, Österreich und Portugal 1959/60 die Europäische Freihandelsgemeinschaft (EFTA).[4] Anders als die EWG war diese Organisation zwischenstaatlich organisiert und anfänglich ausschließlich auf den zollfreien Handel von Industrieprodukten ausgerichtet. Außerdem war der Vertrag informell mit bilateralen Konzessionen im landwirtschaftlichen Handel diplomatisch verbunden. Allerdings sah die EFTA durchaus Mehrheitsabstimmungen vor, und zwar in Abwesenheit eines supranationalen Gerichtshofs wie in der EWG durch die Mitgliedstaaten, um einen Vertragsbruch festzustellen und andere Mitgliedstaaten zu Gegenmaßnahmen zu autorisieren.

Mit der Ausnahme der Schweiz, Liechtensteins, Norwegens und Islands sind inzwischen (2016) alle früheren EFTA-Staaten der EU beigetreten. Norwegen und Liechtenstein sind immerhin über den Europäischen Wirtschaftsraum wirtschaftlich, rechtlich und institutionell eng mit der EU verbunden, allerdings ohne direkten Einfluss auf EU-Entscheidungen zu haben. Die Rolle der EFTA beschränkt sich daher inzwischen hauptsächlich auf die informelle Koordinierung der Außenhandelspolitik der Mitgliedstaaten, vor allem im Kontext der Welthandelsorganisation (WTO). Das sollte jedoch nicht darüber hinwegtäuschen, dass die EFTA nach ihrer Gründung wichtige Funktionen im europäischen Integrationsprozess hatte. Diese waren zunächst wirtschaftlicher Natur. So gelang es der EFTA anderthalb Jahre vor der EWG, alle Binnenzölle auf Industrieprodukte zum 31. Dezember 1966 abzuschaffen. Die industrielle Freihandelszone schuf indirekt erstmals einen weitgehend integrierten Wirtschaftsraum der nordischen Staaten, deren grenzüberschreitender Handel nach der EFTA-Gründung geradezu explodierte. Wie erst in Ansätzen erforscht worden ist, war die EFTA mit ihren Institutionen darüber hinaus nicht nur auf Regierungsebene, sondern auch für gesellschaftliche Organisationen wie politische Parteien und Gewerkschaften ein Forum für grenzüberschreitende Kontakte und Sozialisierung, zunächst im EFTA-Rahmen, aber später auch organisationsübergreifend mit staatlichen und nicht-staatlichen Akteuren aus der heutigen EU. Dies half wiederum, kulturelle Barrieren gegen eine Annäherung und einen möglichen Beitritt zur EWG/EU abzubauen.

Die EFTA litt jedoch von Anfang an unter erheblichen strukturellen ökonomischen, politischen und institutionellen Schwächen, die in der sogenannten „surcharge“-Krise im Herbst 1964 auf das Schärfste deutlich wurden.[5] Dies war knapp ein Jahr bevor die EWG ihrerseits infolge der Politik des leeren Stuhls ihre größte Krise bis dato erlebte, als de Gaulle alle Sitzungen des Ministerrats durch französische Absenz boykottieren ließ. Die neue britische Labour-Regierung von Premierminister Harold Wilson löste die „surcharge“-Krise mit der Erhöhung aller Zölle auf industrielle Importe um 15 Prozent im Oktober 1964 aus, mit der sie das wachsende Zahlungsbilanzdefizit Großbritanniens kontrollieren wollte. Dieses war keinesfalls exorbitant hoch, aber aus britischer Sicht deshalb besorgniserregend, weil das Land eigentlich Zahlungsbilanzüberschüsse erwirtschaften musste, um weiterhin den Sterling-Währungsraum und seine verbliebene Großmachtrolle zu finanzieren. Anstatt binnenwirtschaftliche Maßnahmen wie eine Abwertung des Pfund Sterling oder die zeitweise Wiedereinführung von quantitativen Beschränkungen zur Begrenzung steigender Importe zu wählen, entschied sich die Regierung Wilson ausgerechnet für die einzige Politikoption, die im Rahmen des EFTA-Vertrags offensichtlich illegal war. Sie tat dies zunächst, ohne die Auswirkungen ihrer Entscheidung auf die EFTA überhaupt sorgfältig zu erwägen oder gar die anderen EFTA-Regierungen zu konsultieren. Als diese sehr scharf protestierten, bemühte sich die britische Regierung halbherzig, die EFTA-Staaten de facto von der Zollerhöhung auszunehmen, verzichtete darauf aber sofort, als deutlich wurde, dass die Vereinigten Staaten, Frankreich und die Bundesrepublik Deutschland unter diesen Umständen nicht bereit gewesen wären, Großbritannien dringend benötigte Kredite zur Verfügung zu stellen.

Vor diesem Hintergrund wurden die Auswirkungen der britischen Zollerhöhung auf die EFTA und deren Handel zunächst auf Beamtenebene diskutiert, bevor sich am 19.–20. November 1964 die Außen- und Handelsminister der EFTA-Staaten im Finnland-EFTA-Ministerrat trafen. Bei diesem Gremium handelte es sich zunächst um eine institutionelle Konzession an die Sowjetunion als Vorbedingung für deren Zustimmung zur Assoziierung Finnlands mit der EFTA im Jahr 1961. Nach und nach trafen sich die Vertreter der sieben EFTA-Regierungen jedoch nicht mehr separat – als EFTA-Ministerrat –, sondern nur noch mit den finnischen Vertretern in diesem Gremium. Insofern wurde Finnland bis 1964 de facto, wenngleich nicht de jure, ein gleichberechtigtes Mitglied der Organisation. Der Auszug aus dem Protokoll dieser Sitzung vom November 1964, der diesem Essay als Quelle beigefügt ist[6], verdeutlicht auf eindeutige Weise die Bedenken und Einwände der Partner Großbritanniens gegen die Zollerhöhung. Vor allem die Schweizer und schwedischen Minister kritisierten die britische Politik scharf und hielten ohne Wenn und Aber fest, dass die Maßnahme illegal war. Hans Schaffner, der Schweizer Handelsminister, stellte klar: „The 15 per cent charge was not compatible with the Stockholm Convention.“ Besonders die Schweden und Dänen verwiesen auch darauf, wie nachteilig die britische Maßnahme nicht nur für den EFTA-Handel war, sondern auch für den politischen Zusammenhalt der Organisation. Der schwedische Handelsminister Gunnar Lange warnte: „The measure itself and the way it had been handled contributed to the crisis of confidence in which EFTA now found itself. [...] Unintentionally it had dealt a severe blow to the Association which he could only hope would not be fatal“.

Der sozialdemokratische Außenminister Dänemarks, Per Haekkerup, verwies auf die parlamentarische Initiative der Konservativen und der rechtsliberalen Venstre-Partei, die nun zunehmend offen dafür plädierten, zur EWG überzulaufen, wozu Dänemark schon im Januar 1963 von de Gaulle eingeladen worden war, als dieser den Beitritt Großbritanniens erstmals blockierte.

Die Teilnehmer an der vertraulichen Sitzung äußerten sich sehr direkt. Die scharfe Kritik an der britischen Politik spiegelt nicht zuletzt die sich rasch verbreitende Wahrnehmung wider, dass Großbritannien als Führungsmacht innerhalb der EFTA und in der europäischen Politik sowohl wirtschaftlich als auch politisch zu schwach war und wegen seines ursprünglichen Selbstausschlusses vom „Kerneuropa“ der sechs Gründungsstaaten auch nicht über genügend Einfluss verfügte, um gegen die Präferenzen de Gaulles die handelspolitische Spaltung Westeuropas in die EWG und EFTA zu überwinden. Nach einem ersten vergeblichen Versuch 1960, ein handelspolitisches Arrangement zwischen den beiden Blöcken zu erreichen, hatte die konservative britische Regierung im Jahr 1961 den Beitritt zur EWG beantragt. Dieser Versuch, wirtschaftliche Kerninteressen und eine vermeintliche Sonderstellung in den transatlantischen Beziehungen zu sichern, scheiterte jedoch im Januar 1963 an dem Veto de Gaulles. Obwohl Premierminister Harold Macmillan den EFTA-Regierungen 1961 zugesagt hatte, ihre Kerninteressen in den Verhandlungen zu wahren, waren diese allerdings bis Januar 1963 über den Beginn von Beitrittsverhandlungen mit Dänemark hinaus noch nicht einmal thematisiert worden. Von der neuen Labour-Regierung, die 1964 gewählt wurde, hatten sich die EFTA-Staaten eher eine Stärkung des inneren Zusammenhalts der EFTA erwartet, sodass sie von der „surcharge“-Entscheidung besonders enttäuscht waren. Schließlich beantragte die Regierung Wilson 1967 sogar selbst den EWG-Beitritt, der allerdings erst Anfang 1973 erfolgen sollte.

Ob bürgerlich oder mehr sozialdemokratisch in ihrer politischen Orientierung, waren sich alle anderen EFTA-Regierungen einschließlich des portugiesischen Vertreters der Salazar-Diktatur einig, dass die britische Wirtschaftspolitik ungeeignet war, die immer deutlicher zu Tage tretenden strukturellen Probleme des Landes zu lösen. Außerdem hatte die britische Zollerhöhung massive Auswirkungen auf den Handel der kleineren EFTA-Staaten, die – vor allem im Falle der skandinavischen Länder – einen bedeutenden Teil ihres Außenhandels mit Großbritannien abwickelten. Zugleich blieben Staaten wie die Schweiz und Österreich in ihrem Handel stärker auf die Bundesrepublik Deutschland (und teilweise Frankreich und Italien) orientiert, da die Zollerleichterungen nicht die anderen Wettbewerbsvorteile wie geografische Nähe ausgleichen konnten.

Der Verlauf der „surcharge“-Krise verdeutlicht darüber hinaus auch eine gravierende institutionelle Schwäche der EFTA. Die britische Regierung versuchte gar nicht erst, ihre Zollerhöhung als mit dem EFTA-Vertrag vereinbar darzustellen. Sie stimmte vielmehr zu, dass diese eindeutig illegal war. Für diesen Fall hätte es jedoch die Option gegeben, dazu einen formellen Beschluss zu fassen und die anderen EFTA-Staaten zu ermächtigen, gleichwertige Gegenmaßnahmen gegen Importe aus Großbritannien zu ergreifen. Die EFTA-Partner entschieden sich jedoch dagegen. Für diesen Fall wäre die Organisation vermutlich zerbrochen. Großbritannien wäre öffentlich diskreditiert gewesen, während Finnland und Portugal, aber auch die Schweiz und Schweden andererseits keine Möglichkeit sahen, in einem solchen Fall der EWG beizutreten – dies abgesehen davon, dass gerade gegen die Assoziierung der Schweiz und Schwedens innerhalb der EWG große Vorbehalte bestanden, da erwartet wurde, dass beide Länder zwar die wirtschaftlichen Vorteile, aber ohne die rechtlich-institutionellen und finanziellen Verpflichtungen wählen wollten, sodass beide Länder in der Europäischen Kommission sogar als „les nations SS“ bekannt waren.[7] Innerhalb der EWG wäre hingegen die Kommission verpflichtet gewesen, einen so eklatanten Vertragsbruch durch einen Mitgliedstaat vor den Europäischen Gerichtshof zu bringen, und dieser, den Mitgliedstaat zu vertragskonformem Verhalten zu verpflichten. Diese supranationale rechtlich-institutionelle Organisation der heutigen EU reflektiert nicht nur die ursprünglichen tendenziell föderalistischen Präferenzen der Gründungsstaaten, sondern hat sich auch als insgesamt wirksamer konstitutioneller Rahmen erwiesen, um kleinere Mitgliedstaaten genauso wie schwächere gesellschaftliche Akteure und Interessen vor der Willkür der „Großen“ zu schützen.



[1] Essay zur Quelle: European Free Trade Association, Sitzung des Ministerrats (19.–20. November 1964). Die Druckversion des Essays befindet sich in: Hartmut Kaelble, Rüdiger Hohls (Hgg.): Geschichte der europäischen Integration bis 1989, Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag 2016, S. 143—147, Band 1 der Schriftreihe Europäische Geschichte in Quellen und Essays.

[2] Zur Europapolitik der „latecomer“ siehe in vergleichender Perspektive: Kaiser, Wolfram; Elvert, Jürgen (Hgg.), European Union Enlargement. A Comparative History, London 2004.

[3] Kaiser, Wolfram, Großbritannien und die Europäische Wirtschaftsgemeinschaft 1955–1961. Von Messina nach Canossa, Berlin 1996.

[4] af Malmborg, Mikael; Laursen, Johnny, The Creation of EFTA, in: Olesen, Thorsten B. (Hg.), Interdependence versus Integration. Denmark, Scandinavia and Western Europe, 1945–1960, Odense 1995, S. 197–212.

[5] Kaiser, Wolfram, The Successes and Limits of Industrial Market Integration. The European Free Trade Association 1963–1969, in: Loth, Wilfried (Hg.), Crises and Compromises. The European Project 1963–1969, Baden-Baden 2001, S. 371–390.

[6] Joint Council FINLAND-EFTA, 25. Sitzung, 19.–20.11.1964, EFTA-Archiv Genf, FINEFTA/JC.SR 25/64, 22.01.1965. Die folgenden Quellenzitate stammen, soweit nicht anders vermerkt, aus den hier mit veröffentlichten Quellenausschnitten.

[7] Laut dem französischen Botschafter in Schweden, de la Chauvinière. Zitiert nach af Malmborg, Mikael, Gaullism in the North? Sweden, Finland and the EEC in the 1960s, in: Loth, Wilfried (Hg.), Crises and Compromises. The European Project 1963–1969, Baden-Baden 2001, S. 489–508.



Literaturhinweise

  • Kaiser, Wolfram, Großbritannien und die Europäische Wirtschaftsgemeinschaft 1955–1961. Von Messina nach Canossa, Berlin 1996.
  • Ders.; Elvert, Jürgen (Hgg.), European Union Enlargement.
  • Loth, Wilfried (Hg.), Crises and Compromises: The European Project 1963–1969, Baden-Baden 2001.

Zugehörige Quelle:
Quelle zum Essay
Das Europa der "äußeren Sieben". Die "surcharge"-Krise der Europäischen Freihandelsgemeinschaft im Herbst 1964
( 2008 )
Zitation
European Free Trade Association (EFTA) Sitzung des Ministerrats, November 1964, in: Themenportal Europäische Geschichte, 2008, <www.europa.clio-online.de/quelle/id/q63-28469>.
Navigation